Monday, 21 September 2015

Coydog community page

See: "Living with a coyote hybrid (Coydog)"


Click to enlarge photographs (Free for non-profit use)

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This is Bandit, although, he also knows his very original nickname, Coyote. He is a rescue dog that is supposed to be Aussie/Queensland. He has the healer coloring, but his temperament and behavior is completely bizarre in terms of any dog behavior I have seen. He looks like a coyote, and has many traits pointing to the possibility of having coyote genes...he is approaching 2 years old.

MoonFire




John's Coydog Community page

8 comments:

  1. To be honest I'm new at this breed first time I ever saw one and Thor (my coy-boy) is my buddy I love him I just wanna do great by him so yeah to my question >>>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>> How can I get my Coydog To listen to me and any reprimands I give and also any and every kind/type of instructions I give?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For specific problems, you might find some useful advice in the "Living with a coyote hybrid..." (link at the top of this page) and its comments, but generally it is good to keep in mind that unlike the wolf, the coyote has never been trained and has never sought to engage with humans in a mutually advantageous way.

      So it is mostly a matter of tempering the training one gives the dog part with being a family member to the coyote part. The coyote part likes to have a family and would not want to disappoint them so if you seem disappointed in something they have done, they will want to avoid that as much as possible, but any adversarial situation situation is not going to work very well, nor is working for treats. It's a balancing act between training a dog and being family to a coyote. It takes time and patience.

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  2. I rescued mine from a shelter. I had Cody Logan Micallef for 11.5 and had to put him down a week ago. This breed is incredible. If you have the opportunity to raise one you will not be disappointed. He was so smart, loyal, and friendly. When he was younger he use to sleep under the bed (like a coyote den), he was fearful of loud noises but never barked. He would howl. He communicated and understood the English language. He understood sentences. I had no problems with other dogs, kids, people - anything. The only problem I would have is people stopping me on every walk either asking what he was or saying how beautiful he was. They listen well and learn quickly. They don't like being in trouble and sense your energy. If they upset you its rare that they will repeat the behavior. Dog toys didn't work. He liked pinecones and sticks. He didn't even like dog treats so I never trained him with them. He knew how to sit before he crossed the street, I never had him on a leesh as this was very unnatural for him. He would stay no more than 3 feet away from me at all times unless we were running. My sister had children and he loved new borns. He was very protective of children or anything smaller than him. I trained him not to chase other animals and he learned so quickly. Honestly I wish I could find another. KNOW this hybrid is a rarity and a blessing. If you come across one they are more than just dogs. Being half wild they have a different spirit. Its incredible. Enjoy

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing this, Ania, and I am sorry for your loss, but it is obvious that Cody had a very happy life with you. What you say about them is absolutely true, they are much more than dogs but they also need people who are much more than just dog-owners too! I hope you will find another one soon (Tristan also sometimes sleeps under my bed).

      Best,

      John

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  3. Is this the community page?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, a little sparse, still, but anyone is welcome to send me photos of their coydog with any other material, personal or business details and I will post it here.

      Best,

      John

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  4. Love these animals! I have had one but never actually needed to train him for anything. I got him when I was 13 and remember the first time I realized he was not a dog... A mole had bit his nose one day after he had it cornered. I walked out the door the next morning to go to school and there were about 20 moles scattered around our porch. He had went on a mole hunting expedition... Some were even headless. Thankfully we lived in the country but yeah... They are not dogs. He was super proud of himself though :-)... So was I!

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    Replies
    1. Vengeance! What a great story. No one messes with the coydog.

      Best,

      John

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